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President report May 2022

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Valued Members, On Friday the 8th of April our members who attended the club were treated with some special entertainment from Jimmy Jack. I sadly was unable to attend Jimmy’s performance due to a repeat flooding of Wallacia bridge including all the other escape routes from this area lasting several days, I thank La Nina rainfall for this. Some other members had to cancel because of other weather problems I was delighted to receive reports. From those attending showing their appreciation for Jimmy’s entertaining musical performance. April 15th the club was closed for the Easter break to allow member time with their loved ones and travel for the long weekend. I must report that I was very good in resisting the temptation of over indulging in the consumption of those appealing chocolate Easter eggs. Friday 22nd we continued our Anzac tradition with music and  the Rembrandt variant of Two Up games. Wednesday mornings members still play Triominos and Klaverjassen no bookings are required. The purchase of Your Dutch treats are still in great demand via Gerda and frozen foods via myself, to assure frozen orders are delivered please pre order for Wednesday & Friday club delivery. Friday 29th was our King’s Day meeting and saw members contributing to the festivities by wearing your favourite Dutch regalia. We thank all those dedicated members for their continued patronage, stay safe, see you at the Rembrandt. Allan J. Potter



Past and present May 2022

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How it all started part 4. Back in 1985 my first trip back home. Our 2 youngest came with me. Tradition in my family circle was; one night every week the ladies come together to catch up while ironing, doing any craft or just enjoying coffee and a drink after. Daughter Petra was only 16 at the time and enjoyed these evenings with her aunties. When we came home it was decided to start this to and name it the same as in Holland; TRUTTE AVOND. The Dutch ladies reading this would at this moment just smile or go OMG. After a few months of these nights we came up with the idea of ‘doing something productive’. So, we practiced some songs and decided to perform at the Sunrise Christmas party, as well as the Rembrandt Dutch Club. We made all the costumes our self. This was the start of many entertainment nights. Together with my sister in law we imitated the Alpen zusjes. It all started as a joke, but after some practice people actually believed that we were the singing artists. We had a TV crew from Holland at the club ones, to do a write up about the Rembrandt Club and film some moments. There was some good fun to be had.
Petra decided that she would like to go back to Holland for a year. The deal was; go in the NSW Holland Festival quest and raise enough money to win. The decision was made for the 1987 Festival and we had a family night at the Club. Every person paid $10.00 entry fee and received 10 tickets in the lottery. During the night there were more tickets sold. This was the first of many Holland Festival quest nights. For entertainment we organise a ‘commercial’ show and an ‘out of tune’ singing contest. The funniest commercial was the one about that wine CARTE D’OR, famous on TV at that time. On the floor was a customer (Beppie Boersma) sitting at a table asking the steward (Wayne Clemens) for a bottle of wine. The Steward asks: What brand would you like? And the customer says: Cart’door. The Steward is confused and keeps asking of she is absolutely sure about that. Yes!!!! So, he goes out and comes back with a car door. (This car door was on loan from a detailer). The out of tune contest was complete with judges. The contestant with the lowest points result would win. There were some good (bad) singers. I really wanted to win this contest and did my best playing guitar and singing the Italian song Quan do Quan do Quan do. With the guitar out of tune there was no way of singing properly. Yes, I did win with a below zero score.

 

 

 

After Petra won the Festival quest, I wanted to do some more good work so the Heart Foundation was my choice. Again the Club opened the doors to a good course. This time it would be professional entertainment. The aim was to organise a “Pot of Gold” night. I wonder how many members remember this night. Looking for a jury panel was easy. Bernard King was replaced by Johan Wewer and of course he was our main man on the panel. To get some good artists together Petra and I went to Studio B in Sydney. There were artists of any kind and after explaining my Heart Foundation event they were all keen to perform for free. However, Petra and I had to sing for them. We picked this one; Take me home country road, but with these words. TAKE ME HOME POT HOLE ROAD. TO THE PLACE I COME FROM. WESTERN SYDNEY, BLUE MOUNTAINS. TAKE ME HOME POTHOLE ROAD. They had a chuckle about this alright. On the night the entry money went to the heart Foundation. Every guest would bring a cake. We sold coffee and cake galore. This was my main event and took me to the Heart Foundation final. I didn’t win but won new Club members



Kitchen Corner May 2022

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Stamppot is synonymous with Dutch winter food
These vegetable pairings traditionally include sauerkraut, endive, kale, spinach, turnip greens, or carrot and onion (the combination of the latter two is known as hutspot in the Netherlands and as wortelstamp in Belgium). Leafy greens such as endive may be left raw and added to the potatoes only at the mashing stage. Some less common regional varieties of stamppot are made with fruit and potatoes, such as blauwe bliksem (blue lightning), made with pears, and hete bliksem (hot lightning), made with sweet apples. Pineapple may also be included in sauerkraut or andive stampot. In recent years, variations on the traditional stamppot have been becoming more and more popular with people adding ingredients such as rocket, leeks, beets, sweet potato, mushrooms and various other vegetables. Sometimes, fish is used as an ingredient in stamppot as well. Stamppot is primarily a cold-weather dish.
Stamppot is usually served with sausage (in the Netherlands often smoked, in Belgium more often fried), julienned bacon, or stewed meat. Other accompaniments include cheese, gherkins, nuts, and pickled onions.
Prepared stamppot can be purchased from shops and supermarkets. It can also be ordered in cafe-style restaurants, but more strict recent regulations about allowed foods in taverns versus restaurants has restricted the custom of offering simple dishes in many Belgian pubs.
The origin of stamppot is unknown, although legend attributes the invention of hutspot to the 1574 Siege of Leiden. 4

 



Past and present April 2022

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The inside of the building at Dunheved Circuit was looking good. The bar and the stage were built with Dutch tradesman-ship. On the outside a couple of beautifully painted signs decorated the front.
Slowly but surely concrete slabs were being poured. One of the committee members had an acquaintance in the concrete business. The deal was; every time they were stuck with a decent load the club would take it at a fair discount. Over the years this was where our “Dutch-ness” would shine. There is no business like dealing with the Dutchies. By now people might wonder how the picture of the NIGHTWATCH ended up on the wall. One of our members went for a holiday overseas and brought it back. The picture was printed in panels like wallpaper. No shortage of wall hangers in this club either. It has always been the most famous wall of all.
The cleaning of the building was done on Tuesday mornings by a small group of volunteers. The idea came up to sell some Dutch goodies. To start with, there was a draw in a filing cabinet standing in the kitchen. The lady looking after it then had no drivers licence so sometimes, I took her to the Dutch shop. Members would have to ask if there was anything available on Friday. It was mainly biscuits. Later there was liquorice and jars of vegies and one drawer was not big enough.
A pool table was put in the little side room, later known as the choir room. If there was an event when children were allowed to join, they could play pool. In the early years young children were not welcome on Friday night. Our son was not old enough to stay home by himself, so we made him comfortable in the car and he could sleep while we would go inside the building. We were not the only ones to do this. The kids were safe, sleeping in the car on the side parking of the building. The only thing was, he would wake up as soon as the car stopped, and we would have to go for another ride around the block. During dance nights there’d be typical Dutch food prepared by the ladies in the kitchen. There was also a ‘special event’ when the members were asked to cook a dish and would be reimbursed for the cost. It was a buffet feast with many dishes from international cuisine,
since some ladies were not Dutch at all. Most dishes were donated to the club. It was a fundraiser with a difference. Call it a ‘Tasty’ one. The Christmas dinners/buffets would also be set up in the little side room. The pool table covered and decorated was an excellent serving table.
On Friday nights there was always fresh coffee and bread rolls. Slowly but surely the krokets and bitterballen became famous, because there was no other Dutch Club in St Marys. Few people know that these goodies were actually manufactured in St Marys. A family business that had the same business in Limburg. The same person manufacturing krokets and fricandellen then is still doing this today. However, the business has changed owners a few years ago.



President report April 2022

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Valued Members,
The past months posed more challenges for our members starting with the La Nina weather
affecting many areas of NSW , creating havoc on our roads with the unbelievable amounts of heavy
rainfall flooding many low lying areas. Our sympathy goes out to the unfortunate people affected
who lost loved ones, family homes, possessions and livestock. On a brighter note I thank those
members who dared to brave the elements by attending our Wednesday mornings and Friday nights.
Your club directors have been busy arranging for the future entertainment of our members and
guests. April 8th, we have “ Jimmy Jack “ The Ultimate One Man Band . Jimmy has performed in many
great venues for over 35 years and is a must for your bucket list. Robert Brown will enthral us in the
art of Ballroom Dancing , sessions for many types of dancing will start after Easter on 22nd April from
4:30pm till 5:30pm to work up a little appetite. Our own talented Herman Zirkzee will take us down memory
lane with some accordion music on the 27th April. Our March Bingo was played utilising our new equipment
and improved rules and will return in May. Games night has evolved into a more hands on with new 6 pin
bowling and sjoelbak as well as tabletop games for young and old. As always thank you to our members and
guests for their continued support, stay safe, see you at the Rembrandt Club. Allan J. Potter



Kitchen Corner April 2022

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A tompouce is a kind of pastry that is considered a staple in Dutch and Belgian cuisines. It usually consists of layers of
puffed pastries with soft cream in between and icing on top. It is also described as rectangular or “brick-shaped,”. This
pastry is similar to a Dutch version of the French pastry, the napoleon. Tompouce can also be spelled as “tompoes.”
The origins of the name “tompouce” are uncertain, but an interesting account suggests that the Dutch pastry was first
invented in the 1840s by a baker in Amsterdam, the capital of the Netherlands. During that time, an American circus
show was performing and had stopped in the city. One of the starring performers was a dwarf named Charles
Sherwood Stratton, who used as his stage name “General Tom Thumb,” or “Generale Tom Pouce” in French. The baker
was so impressed with Tom Pouce that he borrowed the name for his new pastry.. The basic structure of the
tompouce includes a few layers of thin puffed pastry at the very bottom with a thick, generous amount of pale yellow
cream in the middle. These are topped with another layer of pastry to sandwich the cream. The pastry is finished off
with a spread of pink icing, sometimes with a final stripe or dollop of white icing on topMaking a tompouce has
become easier with the advent of pre-made puff pastry, which is available in many grocery stores' freezer cases.
Bakers who make their own puff pastry need large quantities of butter to achieve the layered appearance common to
croissants. The pastry cream generally consists of milk, eggs, and flour, as well as some salt and a lot of sugar. For
added flavoring, a few spoonfuls of vanilla or some fruit extracts, like lemon or strawberry, can also be added, but care
should be taken not to add too much liquid, which could prevent the cream from thickening. The pink icing is usually
made with butter, milk, and confectioner’s sugar, with a little red food coloring. Since the time of its invention, the
traditional recipe and ingredients for the tompouce have changed very little, making it an iconic and classic Dutch
pastry dish.



Past and present January 2022

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How it all started. Early in 1978 when we were living in Hoxton Park our friend Frans Klaassen visited us. He was very excited about the fact that a group of friends were starting a new Dutch club.
Q; New? What’s wrong with the existing one ‘Wilhelmina’?
A; It was the fact that there were poker machines installed and a group of members was totally against gambling.
Q; So, if this new club you are starting does something you don’t agree with, will you be starting another club again??
A; No, no, no, it is the gambling we are against. It will be in the constitution of the new club that this is not ever allowed to happen.
We, Jan and I were thinking hard about this answer and left it up to the original group to start the Rembrandt Dutch Club how they wanted it. We did however become members.
The Foundation members were; K & J Dooms, N & B Boersma, J & A Geluk, J & W Grabijn, W Holmes, F Klaassen, H & A Klijmij, G Langenberg, A & L Maasland, P & B Maasland, W & I Matzer, W & I Matzer jnr, L Pennings and G van Bergen.
While writing this I also like to reminisce about the Wilhelmina Club. We migrated in 1971 which was well after the Wilhelmina Club settled in Auburn. It was a ‘gezellige’ club. That is where I met Beppie Boersma during one visit, when we managed to get a baby sitter, and Jan and my Dad, who was here on holidays played billiards. Beppie showed me the card game Solitaire. We became friends with many club goers. One day there was a family night with a singing contest. The Sunrise Choir was also involved. Our 5 year old daughter sang; De Speeltuin. She won a club-souvenir spoon.
Then one day the Wilhelmina Club moved to Rooty Hill, to the old Rooty Hill RSL Club building. Jan helped with the move. (Years later a young man visiting the Rembrandt Club recognised Jan and said: I remember you helped my Opa with moving Wilhelmina. That was a grandson of Koos(je) Dooms.) We visited Wilhelmina in Rooty Hill a few times. The board tried to improve the club, but the noise of the poker machines overruled. We went to our very first Sinterklaas party with friends and children. Sinterklaas arrived by train and his horse was waiting for him. Everyone walked from Rooty Hill station to the club. There were people dressed in Dutch Folkloric outfits. It was all very exciting, especially for the little people. And now we are back to where we started. Decisions were made. Rembrandt was born. The first couple of years the club was at Lee Holm Drive on the other side of Dunheved Industrial Park. The Pennings Brothers rented us (Rembrandt) a unit to help out. The inside of the unit was dressed up with huge paintings of Dutch sceneries, framed and covered with curtains. It was like looking out into the Dutch streets and fields of flowers. The coffee was free for visitors and there was almost always a person playing the piano. This was an excellent meeting place.



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